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The Comics Alternative


The Comics Alternative is weekly podcast focusing on the world of alternative, independent, and primarily non-superhero comics. (There's nothing wrong with superhero comics. We just want to do something different.) New podcast episodes become available every Wednesday and include reviews of graphic novels and current ongoing series, discussions of upcoming comics, examinations of collected editions, in-depth analyses of a variety of comics texts, and spotlights on various creators and publishers. The Comics Alternative also produces "special feature" programs, such as shows specifically dedicated to creator interviews, webcomics, on-location events, and special non-weekly themes and topics.

 

May 26, 2015

On this episode of the monthly manga show, Derek and Shea discuss the recently published Henshin, by Ken Niimura (Image Comics), and Katsuhiro Otomo’s classic Akira (Kodansha Comics). They begin with Henshin, a thirteen-story collection from the artist behind I Kill Giants (and written by Joe Kelly). Shea points out that it’s difficult to find much information on Niimura, as most of his work has been published in either Japan or in Spain. But Henshin — which means “transformation” in Japanese —- may be a good introduction to his work. As the guys point out, the stories cover a variety of genres, from crime to cooking to sports to salaryman narratives  There are also four autobiographical shorts interspersed throughout. Neither Shea nor Derek feel that these tales are as successful as the non-autobiographical stories, but they do show a lighter and more personal side of Niimura’s work. The tone in the other nine pieces are more dramatic, and at times tender and even melancholic. All in all, the collection is a multifaceted example of a non-traditional kind of manga. Next, the Two Guys look at a classic manga title, Otomo’s Akira. This series is a challenge to discuss, because it’s a sprawling saga that develops over six collected and thick volumes. But Derek and Shea highlight the premise and significance of the story, contextualizing it within the 1980s and as an example of post-apocalyptic cyberpunk storytelling. They briefly compare the manga to the anime version, pointing out many of the stark differences between the two. Shea emphasizes what he sees as the Western or European storytelling influence on Akira —- indeed, he sees the same in Henshin —- yet at the same time highlights this as a seminal work of manga. This is an ambitious attempt for the guys to cover such a title, and they could easily devote an entire episode to the series. But listeners will come away with a sense of the story, if they’re not already familiar with it, and hear some of the major critical points that define Akira. If you’re interested in manga, this is definitely a series you have to experience.